Friday, 11 July 2014

Do you take random comments personally?

I ask this question because I was involved in my favourite breakfast ritual - having my tea and crumpet whilst reading my favourite sewing blogs and one of the comments left on a fave blog set my teeth on edge.

As a trainer I often facilitate discussions on conflict in the workplace, managing poor behaviour etc and I say to my students that taking someone's non directed comment personally says much more about you than about them. Why do you take something personally that wasn't personally aimed at you. It is about self confidence - the self confident person would not think the comment was aimed at them.

Herein lies the rub. I am not a confident sewist by any stretch of the imagination. I look in awe at the wonderful creations that others make and here I am making another pull on top and another pull on pair of trousers. Sigh.

The comment that had me so riled was about the lack of effort put in to their sewing by a lot of new bloggers.

Immediately a soliloquy started - "Often new bloggers are new sewers and not that experienced"! "People should be able to sew what they want and not be judged - after all we are sewing for ourselves"! I still feel like I am 5 years old when sewing - how refined was your sewing when you were 5?"! etc. etc.

Then I realised I was doing what I lecture my students on not doing. Taking something personally. This was one person giving her opinion on which she is just as entitled to do as I am to sew what I want. Believe me - this post is about me - not the commentator.

Why I reacted was because I feel that way about myself so it hit where it hurts. I am NOT putting in the effort. I am sewing comfortably instead of trying new things. Part of that is because I need clothes desperately so need to fill the wardrobe, part is because when I try new things they often fail.. Here is one such item.. I moved out of my comfort zone and made a Georgette tunic instead of a knit.


I was quite happy with this when I made it. I thought the fit was spot on - not too tight - not too loose - just right. However - this must not have been the case. The first and only time I wore it - to work in front of a class of 10 - it didn't hold up. I was driving home and felt something on my back shoulder - reached behind to scratch and was horrified to find flesh there instead of fabric.... Got home BOTH shoulder seams were split.

Next day I asked the class why they didn't tell me and they assured me that they didn't notice - hmmmm. I am too scared to wear the chiffon tunic I made now.

This week I am sewing my first pockets. In seam pockets in pull on pants!!

I started sewing in October 2011 and will be sewing for 3 years this October. Sometimes I feel I have really progressed but when I look at all of the things I want to do I feel totally inadequate. My list of skills assessment has only had one update since I put it in and that was French Seams.

So -- I would like one challenge to do. I am putting it out there. Give me a challenge. I don't care how hard. Although the more difficult the challenge the longer I will take to complete. I am hoping to get a lot of suggestions and the most suggested challenge I will complete before the end of this year (or sooner if it is easier). Because when I mean complete I mean to a competent standard so it might take a few goes.

Any suggestions?

44 comments:

  1. You know, there is nothing wrong with comfortable sewing if that's what you need and want in your wardrobe. If you're like me and can't even imagine yourself with a couture cocktail dress because it would hang in the closet forever, why on earth would you waste your time and funds to make it. Lots of us have a casual lifestyle and just need everyday clothes.

    That said, A kind of fun challenge that will give you a quick jolt of satisfaction in improving your skills is to learn to do Hong Kong finishes. I was scared to even try them forever, and when I finally did, I found them to be EASY, and they look so nice and people think you are very accomplished! You can do them on the inside waistband of your new pants.

    Have fun with this!

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  2. You've been sewing less than 3 years?! I never would have guessed. I think you're doing just fine. No need to beat yourself up for doing comfortable sewing. We all do that to one degree or another.
    I admire your desire to learn new techniques. It's too bad your chiffon experience was a bad one. I don't know what could have caused the seams to come apart. I've never worked with chiffon. (And I've been sewing for 47 years!)
    Hong Kong seam finishes would be a good technique to learn. Also pockets, and playing with pockets. If you have the time and some scraps, you could play with different types of pocket styles. That would give you confidence to use them on a garment without worrying about them not turning out well.

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  3. Beajay. I think you have hit the nail right on the head with your comments about self confidence and vulnerabilities and why we might react. I think it is important to sew what we want and how we want and not feel pressured. I seem to sew the same dated patterns and think perhaps I should buy some new shiny ones but then remember I am actually quite happy doing this . Georgette is very delicate. French seams make them stronger and look good and are not hard to do. Hope you are feeling better. Cheers

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  4. Oh yes I do take random comments personally even though I know it is the other persons problem. I am a shocker like that.

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  5. Sorry third comment. I sewed my daughter a beautiful chiffon top . I used a tip from threads and sewed two rows of stitching close together and then trimmed the seams down. Like your top the seams ripped. I was very disappointed because the fabric was divine . No definitely use French seams.

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  6. Oh, BeaJay. I hate that your feelings were hurt, however it happened. :-( I love your sewing. I love everyone's sewing!

    Having said that, I avoid georgette and chiffon like I avoid chittlins...can't do it. I'm chicken. Just sure my seams will come undone, as did yours. Or I'll spit and fume trying to keep the fabric under the presser foot or stop the ravelling. You were so brave, you don't need another challenge!! Bet you get those pockets in the seams of your pull-on pants just fine (they get better with practice and with good luck - I still mess mine up pretty regularly and get out the seam ripper to repair them. I go through about 4 seam rippers each year - they get blunt with use and it really is worth replacing them :-)

    Just enjoy. And thanks for sharing with your buddies.

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  7. My feelings regarding my sewing are similar to yours Beajay. I am in awe of all of the sewing skills I see through blogs . I am learning though, that I have to follow my own needs and my own style. For instance, I love to see couture sewing and lined clothing. However, it doesn't fit my lifestyle--why would I make it? Most sewists enjoy the positive comments they get when they post a new garment. I still struggle with pattern alterations. Who am I fooling--l can't possibly complete with these bloggers' skills. I watch a lot of videos, take a few Craftsy classes, and keep plugging away. I'm a basic top/pants/maxidress (all unlined) kinda girl. That's what I will make and if I do it well, then I've accomplished my goal.

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    1. Beajay...Robin said it perfectly! I am very thankful for sewists who are willing to blog. I have learned and been inspired by all of you. Many have skills far beyond what I will ever have. That's ok. Like Beajay, I'm also a basic tops, pants and maxiskirts kind of girl. And yes unlined. I taught myself to sew. I'm far from perfect, but my imperfections do not rob me of the joy of sewing.

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  8. The quote that I go back to time and time again is from Ira Glass:

    “Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through.”

    The bane of my existence was welt pockets, I could never get them to turn out nicely, but I kept practicing...and today they're pretty darn good! So keep practicing, keep sewing, and keep challenging yourself...you'll fill out that assessment chart with all 3s soon!

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  9. Bea Jay,
    I have sewed for 40 years, and I am still learning so much.And still don't feel "up to par" with the wonderful sewers out there. I feel that no one, should make statements about what we sew.. We all sew things that we love, or want to learn to do. I am a self taught sewer, When I first learned to sew, My baby girl was a baby [she is now a 40 yr old teacher,ha]. I actually learned to sew by making her the simple cross over sun dress. That first summer, All I could make was that dress, so I made about 20 of them. It was simple, but I wasn''t ready to move on to buttons, zippers, collars, sleeves,etc. Even though, I was sewing simple.. I was learning... I was learning to sew the 5/8 inch seam.. I was learning to clip seams.. Iron down my seams.. and learn how to use the seam ripper..It took me a long time, to add the other things to my sewing list.
    Now, that I have sewed for my kids/grandkids, I still haven't sewed a long time for me.. Sewing for an adult is a lot harder than sewing for kids.. So, I am learning how to fit, etc..
    I think you, me, or any other sewer out there, should enjoy our makes.. and sew what we will wear and use.. I find myself, sewing things I see on the blogs, that are not me... and they don't get worn,ha.. I make my simple shorts,tees, pull on pants.. and I wear them to rags..ha
    I am so sorry that the commenter made the comment. Those kinds of things, do hurt our feelings..
    Just know, I think you make some beautiful garments.. Keep sewing things that look good on you, and you enjoy wearing, and when your ready to try a new sewing task... gradually add them.. Enjoy and Happy sewing. Hugs.

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  10. Hmmm....I think that comment is just plain rude. Who has the right to tell someone they haven't put enough effort in?

    Anyway..I think you are doing fine. Just fine. Do you ever see me making Chanel jackets? Nup! Cos I wouldn't wear them. Nowhere to go. People probably think I'm sticking to my comfort zone just making knits and I am. And I'm happy with that.

    As to the chiffon...I would never sew that (except as a swimsuit coverup!). Sweat city. :)

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  11. Of the 300+ patterns I have, you'd think I would make more than the same four (jeans, knit top, jacket, pintuck top)! I am filling holes in my wardrobe and I like making these patterns. There's absolutely nothing wrong with that. I don't have much RTW that fits, so I make what does.

    I am still struggling with fitting a button-front blouse and have avoided welt pockets and collar stands like the plague. Hmm...I think I see another Scary September challenge lurking around the corner!

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    1. Collar stands aren't that bad. I still struggle with welt pockets. I'll make a sample that I think looks good, and then botch them on my "real" fabric. I haven't tackled a button-down blouse in 4 years, either, although I want to make the Archer soon (adding bust darts when I do my FBA). I'm in for a challenge/sewalong!

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  12. we all have different reasons and motivations to sew and what one person thinks is "not putting in the effort" is an opinion she's entitled to, just as I'm entitled to think she's a bit judgemental!

    If I could buy clothes that fit and only sewed as a hobby I'd have the time to make couture level garments. But the only things I can buy is underwear and some knit tops. Knit tops that are always too long and/or with too short sleeves. But it's such a change from not sewing 100% of my visible clothing that I'm buying them.

    chiffon, blergh. Hates it we does.

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  13. Beajay here in Nz there is a brand of clothing for larger women called Chocolat and it is VERY sheshe! I bought a long Chocolat top from a remainder shop for about $200 (would have been well over $500) and I thought I was Christmas. It was made from a silk cotton blend.
    I soon learned why it was remaindered. I suspect they got lots of complaints and withdrew it. The fabric just doesn't have the chops to handle wear - it split all down the back seams, arm scyes and under arm seams the very first time I wore it. So I laboriously sewed dupion silk strips over all the seams, which are now shearing away, and there's a random hole where it looks like ti has simply worn out from me getting up out of my chair 50 times a day.
    Sometimes, fabric just doesn't handle the jandal, and that's all there is to it. French seams help, sewed with a super fine needle so as to minimise the splitting of the warp and weft threads, but we can live to regret it. And I LOVE that top, although I was going to suggest that you could take the pattern in down the centre back some to bring the armholes closer into the body, but if the fabric is shearing away now, it would be even worse then! :(

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  14. I am impressed with your sewing, I have been sewing since I was 18 and I still haven't done a lot of the things listed on your Skills List and not sure if I will ever get around to them. Enjoy your sewing and sew what you want no matter what it is or how much perceived skill it takes. It has been suggested a few times, Hong Kong finishes on your waistbands is a great skill and even lining your pants (cotton voile) will help them not crease a much.

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  15. I really think that new sewers are doing their best - many people are trying to fit sewing in around many other commitments.

    I really don't think it matters if you stick to simple things that work - most wardrobes are built on wearable basics. That is not laziness, it is being practical and realistic. It is not possible to make a wardrobe full of harder to make garments and maintain a living, do the chores and so on. So don't be hard on yourself BeaJay - you've done very well, and if you keep making simple things to clothe yourself, and occasionally venture into more challenging territory (perhaps on holidays) you will slowly get there.

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  16. I'm much the same way and am very self critical of my sewing skills and yet others praise me for the things I make. I don't think I'll ever feel like I've ever perfected anything when it comes to sewing but I always give everything I do my best shot. The best thing of all about sewing is if something doesn't work we what ever we make turns out to be a flop all we've waisted is a bit of fabric and few hours (sometimes many) of our time. But one thing for sure is we tend to generally always learn something from the experience which is a plus :)

    If you're after a challenge my challenge to you would be to take a scrap of that fabric from the top in your pic if you have some left over and practice some different seam techniques that would make the seams more secure... perhaps a little french seam or ?? You don't need to make a whole garment but just have a go at the different types of seams you could possibly use on that fabric to make it more secure and give the seams a beautiful finish. You just never know you might be able to transfer those new skills into rescuing that beautiful top!!! I love that top and I love the print and thing it looks great on you. So it would be a shame to leave it sitting in the wardrobe and not wear it just because of a little tiny shoulder seam issue.

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  17. Sometimes it is the fabric not the sewing or fit. Sew what you wear - that is the most successful sewing. I have been sewing for awhile and like challenges occasionally but right now I am sewing basics and it is just what I need in my wardrobe. Simple skirts, top and cardigans. However I am wearing them to death so to me that means the sewing is successful.

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  18. I feel a little for beginner sewists who blog their makes - the clothes that I made in the early years (in fact maybe the first 10 years of my sewing) were terrible and I can't believe I even wore them, so I'm glad they were not documented for eternity or put up for criticisms from the internet! To be honest I thought you'd be sewing for longer too, and I think your success is evident in that you actually wear the clothes you make

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  19. I love your tops and they look fabulous. You can only do what you can do. You make what you enjoy and what you need. I feel in my sewing that I'm always in doubt but the clothes that work best are clothes that are comfortable and easy. You should be so proud of yourself i think it is difficult putting our garments and ourselves out there, that is enough challenge and hard work. The world is full of differences and that's what makes it interesting.

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  20. A thought-provoking post. I'd be inclined to call the comment a little mean-spirited to be honest but to be more diplomatic, I'd call it plain old subjective. How much effort is enough effort anyway? And can you even gauge effort from a few pictures and posts? I had a few negative comments, not in the blog but I was standing behind someone critiquing my costumes. It hurt for a minute then I realised I didn't actually care what this person thought because I was proud of what I'd done.

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  21. There's no point in sewing (for example) ballgowns if you don't have either the opportunity or the inclination to wear them, is there?.
    Like you, I sew plenty of pull on tops and trousers, because that's what I am comfortable wearing, and they fit in with my lifestyle and wardrobe needs. I happen to like the things you sew, and I sew many of the same patterns myself.

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  22. Such a pity about your top, but I do feel it was the fabric that was at fault, and picking the right fabric is a major problem we all face. I sew for what I need, with the occasional sit-at-the-back-of-the-wardrobe-what-was-I-thinking garment thrown in for good luck. Once I had an ugly comment left, and never have worn that particular top since, still own it, but too scared to wear it. But sewing will always continue for me ... what's there not to love about our great craft. As for a technique to conquer ... well invisible zippers spring to mind ... go on... dare you ... J

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  23. Good Morning from America BeaJay. Wow, I had so many thoughts as I read through your post and how I wish that we could talk in person over a cup of tea. But, our distance keeps that from happening, at least for today :) So, here I go...I began sewing as a small child, but not on a regular basis, primarily when I was with my grandmother. It wasn't until I was in junior high school that I began to sew with a passion, primarily, like you, I needed clothes. My father left us with no money, so I babysat and knitted scarf and hat sets that I would sell. The proceeds of my efforts paid for my fabric. At the time, I thought my clothes were beautifully made, but the truth of the matter was that they weren't, unfinished seams, crooked seams and stitches that would show. But, I wore them with great pride :) So I have been sewing on a regular basis for 40 years!!!!!! I had a wedding gown business for over 10 years, sewing and designing wedding gowns. I taught fashion design on a college level, and I've taught at various other times. There is a LOT of time behind me and I will be the first to say that I am rarely perfectly pleased with what I do. Sometimes, but not always. Since I have begun to read your posts, I have seen your skills blossom. Sometimes we can't see our own forest for the trees :) And by the way, I too have had wardrobe malfunctions!!! I have read remarks that I have felt were very cutting and mean, rarely on my blog, but it breaks my heart nonetheless. I belong to a sewing group here in Chicago. There is a contingency that believes...thinks that we should only showcase couture or tailored clothing. Yes, that's wonderful, but I want to celebrate those who are learning and trying as I feel that in time, once they are comfortable, they will want to do more. There's nothing I love more than to see a person bloom as a sewist. So continue to bloom BeaJay. I would rather see you make 50 pairs of elastic waist pants if that what you need, because I know that with each pair your skills will grow. So my challenge to you is to just be so very proud of where you are, relax and enjoy the process.

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  24. I wrote my comment before I read any of the previous comments. I hope you're smiling as there is a lot of love coming to you from all of us out here in blogland :)

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  25. What's that saying we used to use at work...."I'd love to buy that person for what she is worth and sell her for what she thinks she is worth." We've all been at the "starting gate" once. I remember sewing early on and not realizing that pressing each seam as sewn would make ALL the difference. BUT, I still wore those early garments with pride. I started sewing before sergers.......can you say unfinished seams? I didn't know what a hong kong finish was......it didn't matter to me. I loved some of those garments. Today, my garments are much better that when I began...but still not perfect. Just what is perfect? Couture is not me and that's OK with me; I don't have a need for couture and that's OK, too. Keep up the good work; you have made some lovely garments--I know because I see you modeling them!

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  26. Hopefully by now you are feeling the love!

    I had a squiz at your skills list and you are doing impressively well. Comfort zones should be renamed "consolidation time". We cannot progress without consolidating existing skills.

    I will close with my own personal niggle - spelling errors and typo's really bug me. There is nothing that matches my fury when I see errors in my writing (blog, emails, texts, thesis) after begin certain I had proof read it already. Argh! Funnily enough I find other people's spelling errors make me smile.

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  27. Sod, bother and damn!

    I wrote begin! It should have been BEING.

    $&@?!

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  28. poo poo on nasty commenters, visting your blog has always been a pleasant & encouraging one, here's a tip you can teach in your classes... don't get in a hurry to make something lol I did that not long ago I loved loved loved the fabric, was happy happy happy with the dress's outcome but there was something about it as it seemed like it was sucking me from the back giving my skin a feeling of let me out! I put it side thinking I'd turn it into something else later, a friend discovered for me that I'd sewn 2 sizes togethr lol! lol! a 14 back & a 16 front just does not work not at all lol!! so slow down think before you cut like the carpenter measures twice cuts once we should look twice before we cut lol!

    Helen

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  29. Beajay I follow your blog, although I don't think I've commented before, because I enjoy watching someone figure things out. I started sewing 2 years before you and trust me you have gotten the hang of thing A LOT faster than I have! I'm like you, I have a casual lifestyle and huge holes in my closet. I only just recently made a pair of pants, which I read on blog after blog is a nightmare to fit and you rock it! As for a challenge.. Hong Kong Seams and French Seams are great to try, but I would suggest making a simple skirt with a chiffon top layer, so you can kick chiffon in the butt, and not have to worry about begin exposed if there is another malfunction. What you do, have fun and keep posting!

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  30. BeaJay, you're such a ray of sunshine! You know there are bloggers you love to read because they are great teachers of sewing and produce fabulous fitted garmets that are great works of art. We all admire them, but we are not all that type of sewer. We have to sew what fits our lives. Although you've only been sewing for a few years, and it's not your full time job, your makes are great and suit your lifestyle. Look at the comments above mine. I read through them all. Many are accomplished sewers. Ask yourself why they follow your blog. Keep sewing what suits you and your life and you will grow along the way.

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  31. BeaJay....you are doing awsome! Just remember everyone is entitled to their opinions...and they are just that! What I have found is usually when one puts someone else down, they are quite insecure with themselves, otherwise why attack others. Sew what feels right for you and don't stress what others think you should be or do because at the end of the day its all about you in your sewing world. You are a kind and wonderful person who builds people up, so you hold your head up high...and your sewing is great!

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  32. I had no idea you were so new to sewing!

    Your georgette tunic sounds like a fabric rather than sewing fail. Unfortunately some fabric can look and feel beautiful but once you actually put it to use the flaws come out. I made a pair of yoga pants out of a seemingly good quality cotton/lycra jersey and they split apart at the back crotch after only a few wears. When I looked closer I saw it wasn't my sewing...the fabric just disintegrated at the seams.

    I know the "couture" stuff gets all the love and attention, but I prefer to follow bloggers that make everyday, "real" things that they actually need. I sew to fit a not-so-standard body so the goals of those bloggers are more in line with mine. If tops and pull-on pants are what you need for your wardrobe then sew that! Some people think it is "boring" to blog about multiple version of a pattern but I actually like repeats because even though it is the same pattern every version is different. I sometimes wonder if the people that make all those boned vintage dresses actually wear them...

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  33. BeaJay, I love seeing what you make. I often forget that you haven't been sewing for that long until your occasional off-hand remarks about it. You make wearable clothes that look good on you; that's what counts.

    As far as that blogger goes...she's posted pretty hurtful things towards other people before and posted a few mean-spirited threads on PatternReview. I admit that she makes me nervous as well, as she seems to have appointed herself an authority on blogging and sewing. It's too bad when most of the online sewing community is so positive and supportive!

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  34. I've heard something like this in the knitting community too. About knitters who never move beyond simple garter stitch scaves. In my opinion, there is nothing wrong with someone sticking with something they enjoy, even if it's not as complicated as some of the projects out there. If it makes you happy and it works for you, there's absolutely nothing wrong with sticking to simple scarves and pull on tops/pants or even just making dishcloths! It's your hobby and your time and effort, and if people have a problem with that, it's about them, not you.

    I personally love your garments, although I'm sorry I don't express that more often. Your tops always look so good on you, and I'm so jealous of your success at making pants (my biggest personal sewing hurdle that I haven't manage to jump over yet)! I'm excited to see how your pockets turn out though! Pockets are wonderful things, and I hope they work out for you. :)

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  35. Your top looks really good and fits well. I'm sorry it split but like others have said, I blame the fabric.
    When you're ready to try new things it will come from within.
    Like my meditation teacher would say, be gentle with yourself. What is the most loving thing you can do for yourself?

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  36. Here is a great challenge. Look at what you sew. Look at what you wear. One and the same? Then Be proud!! Not everyone can sew the clothes that they actually like to wear.

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  37. I'm a bit lost for words (and that rarely happens). I'm getting tired of the holier than thou bloggers/sewers that make judgements about why or how you sew. Before reading blogs I didn't think about if I could do something or not, I just figured I'd read the instructions and do it... sometimes I'd do it slowly and maybe the first time would be messy, but so was the first time you ate. You get better with practice. I made welt pockets, a jacket, my sister's wedding dress when I was very young just because I didn't know I couldn't do it, I just figured I could if I followed the instructions. So I just say don't think you can't do it, just do it and it will be fine. Your sewing is great and I love the stuff you see and you wear it.

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  38. BeaJay I follow your blog because I like your style. I enjoy your writing, your fabric and pattern choices, and your enthisuasm. I really like Accordion3's term "consolidation time". I hadn't thought of it like that, but it's true. Hone our skills, and when we are inspired to tackle a new challenge we have a solid foundation to build on.

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  39. Oh Beajay- you are so me! While I read this I nodded like a bobble head Chihuahua! I wrestle with the idea that I could sew 'harder' clothing and create a clothing museum or keep sewing wearable things that make me happy. I tried to get on the 'sew pants' bandwagon but realized I'm a tunic and leggings gal. So finding a challenge that still fits the useablity zone is hard, but you know- you gave me a challenge- I'm ready to use my 1st Style Arc pattern thanks to you. Keep at it- you are brilliant and lovely!

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  40. I'm so sorry their thoughtless comments made you feel that way, Beajay. Ya know what I say? F*ck 'em. Seriously.

    You're sewing because it interests you, and don't let anyone pull you down. I also get stuck in my comfort zone and make very similar things because it's what I want to do, or like you've said, what I'm making fills a gap in my wardrobe. I originally learned how to sew because it interested me but delved deeper into it to make my high school formal dance dresses (because they were so expensive to buy!). However, over the years I have evolved and now mostly sew simpler, more comfortable garments because they actually get worn. Why make shit you're not gonna wear? Silly.

    As for floaty sheer fabrics, I bow to your use of them. I've been sewing for more than half of my life and they are of the devil. They can fray like nothing else, so if your shoulder seams allowances weren't finished, they could've frayed to nothing. Try a French seam next time, or if you did use a French seam, I really have no idea...

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  41. As my Amish neighbor, Mrs. Miller says, " only God does perfect". They make stunning quilts and just don't sweat the small stuff. That being said, I encourage you. You are doing great. And as far as blogs, for me personally, I love to read blogs that show "real" sewing, people struggling with fit, split seams, you name it, and working it through instead of ignoring what they know is an issue or just tossing it in a corner after giving up. Each garment is a lesson and you are doing great. Keep on sewing and inspiring.

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  42. I have just seen your Ponti suit on the 'Sew you our own wardrobe for a year'. You have nothing to worry about, you already wear the clothes you make. That is something to be really proud of. Hope we get to catch up with your skirt fitting. :) Anita

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